Art Sunday

Art Sunday #218: Jean de Brunhoff

Posted on Updated on


The-Story-Of-Babar-with-preface-by-a.a.Milne-Jean-De-Brunhoff-First-edition-Methuen-6-e1438680305985

Jean de Brunhoff (9 December 1899 – 16 October 1937) was a French writer and illustrator remembered for creating the Babar books, the first of which appeared in 1931.

The Babar books began as a bedtime story that Cécile de Brunhoff invented for their children, Mathieu and Laurent, when they were four and five years old, respectively. She was trying to comfort Mathieu, who was sick. The boys liked the story of the little elephant who left the jungle for a city resembling Paris so much that they took it to their father, a painter, and asked him to illustrate it. He turned it into a picture book, with text, which was published by a family-run publishing house, Le Jardin des Modes. Originally, it was planned that the book’s title page would describe the story as told by Jean and Cécile de Brunhoff. However, she had her name removed. Due to the role she played in the genesis of the Babar story, many sources continue to refer to her as the creator of the Babar story.

Source:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_de_Brunhoff

Advertisements

Art Sunday #217: Théophile Steinlen – Le Chat Noir

Posted on Updated on


51yFYJHFAjL

Théophile Alexandre Steinlen (November 10, 1859 – December 13, 1923), was a Swiss-born French Art Nouveau painter and printmaker.

Born in Lausanne, Steinlen studied at the University of Lausanne before taking a job as a designer trainee at a textile mill in Mulhouse in eastern France. In his early twenties he was still developing his skills as a painter when he and his new wife were encouraged by the painter François Bocion to move to the artistic community in the Montmartre Quarter of Paris. Once there, Steinlen was befriended by the painter Adolphe Willette who introduced him to the artistic crowd at Le Chat Noir that led to his commissions to do poster art for the cabaret owner/entertainer, Aristide Bruant and other commercial enterprises.

Source:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Théophile_Steinlen

Click here is you want to learn more about this French cabaret https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Le_Chat_Noir

Art Sunday #216: Alain Gree

Posted on


alain-gree-wallpaper-011

Alain Grée (born 21 July 1936 in Eaubonne, France) is a French illustrator and author.

He is the author of three detective novels (“La Chouette” editions) and produced children’s broadcasts on the French national television for two years.

As an author and illustrator of children’s books, Alain Grée published over 300 works for several editors (Casterman, Hachette, etc.), most in the 1960s and 70s. His books were translated around the world into 25 different languages. In that same period, Alain Grée also invented illustrated artwork for 12 educational board games for children, issued by Nathan.

He also worked as an illustrator for “Pomme d’Api” and “Journal de Babar” magazines. Later he created 10 books as initiation works to ship navigation for Gallimard editions. He was also a journalist for the “Voiles et Voiliers” (sailing ships) magazine for 20 years and is currently working as a graphic designer and editor of advertising publications.

He has been active as a Graphic designer, creating catalogues, brochures, posters etc..

His lovely, beautiful and colourful illustrations have been influencing young illustrators and artists over the world.

Sources:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alain_Grée and http://alaingree.com

Art Sunday #215: Georges Barbier – Fireworks in Venice

Posted on Updated on


fireworks-in-venice-illustration-for-fetes-galantes-by-paul-verlaine-1924_u-l-og3r00

George Barbier, né Georges Augustin Barbier, (1882–1932) was one of the great French illustrators of the early 20th century. Born in Nantes, France on 16 October 1882, Barbier was 29 years old when he mounted his first exhibition in 1911 and was subsequently swept to the forefront of his profession with commissions to design theatre and ballet costumes, to illustrate books, and to produce haute couture fashion illustrations. For the next 20 years Barbier led a group from the Ecoledes Beaux Arts who were nicknamed by Vogue “The Knights of the Bracelet”—a tribute to their fashionable and flamboyant mannerisms and style of dress. Included in this élite circle were Bernard Boutet de Monvel and Pierre Brissaud (both of whom were Barbier’s first cousins), Paul Iribe, Georges Lepape, and Charles Martin. During his career Barbier also turned his hand to jewellery, glass and wallpaper design, wrote essays and many articles for the prestigious Gazette du bon ton. In the mid-1920s he worked with Erté to design sets and costumes for the Folies Bergère and in 1929 he wrote the introduction for Erté’s acclaimed exhibition and achieved mainstream popularity through his regular appearances in L’Illustration magazine. Barbier died in 1932 at the very pinnacle of his success. He is buried in Cemetery Miséricorde, Nantes.

Source:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Barbier_(illustrator)

Art Sunday #214: Jacob Lawrence – Street to Mbari

Posted on Updated on


image

The paintings of Jacob Lawrence express his lifelong concern for human dignity, freedom, and his own social consciousness. His images portray the everyday reality, the struggles and successes of African American life. Using art as an instrument of protest, Lawrence aligned himself with the American school of social realism and Mexican muralist tradition.

Born in Atlantic City, New Jersey, Lawrence grew up in Harlem during the Depression. Harlem was an active cultural center then, and Lawrence became interested in the arts while still a teenager. He received early training at art workshops sponsored by the federal government’s Works Progress Administration (WPA) in Harlem and then studied at the American Artists School in New York. From 1938 to 1939, Lawrence worked in the Federal Arts Project and produced some of his earliest major works. His first important solo exhibition in 1944, at New York’s Museum of Modern Art, secured his place as an important commentator on the American scene, particularly African American experiences. Lawrence died on 9 June 2000.

Source:  https://www.nga.gov/collection/artist-info.1468.html