Art Sunday #182: Piet Mondrian – Lighthouse in Westkapelle 1909


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Pieter Cornelis “Piet” Mondriaan, after 1906 Mondrian; 7 March 1872 – 1 February 1944), was a Dutch painter and theoretician who is regarded as one of the greatest artists of the 20th century. He is known for being one of the pioneers of 20th century abstract art, as he changed his artistic direction from figurative painting to an increasingly abstract style, until he reached a point where his artistic vocabulary was reduced to simple geometric elements.

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Art Sunday #181: Nan Phelps – Flowers in a Blue Vase


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Nan Phelps (née Hinkle; August 25, 1904 – January 17, 1990), was an American folk artist from London, Kentucky. Phelps’ work has often been compared to the more famous Grandma Moses in both style and subject matter.

Phelps paintings not only varied in subject matter they also varied greatly in size and media. She produced paintings that ranged in size from 1” by 1” miniatures to 6’ by 17’ murals. Additionally, Phelps would paint not only upon canvas but also on natural objects such as seashells and rocks. Phelps works continue to be displayed in galleries, churches, museums, embassies, and private residences throughout the world.

Source:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nan_Phelps

 

Art Sunday #180: Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot – Young Girl Reading


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Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot; July 16, 1796 – February 22, 1875) was a French landscape and portrait painter as well as a printmaker in etching. He is a pivotal figure in landscape painting and his vast output simultaneously references the Neo-Classical tradition and anticipates the plein-air innovations of Impressionism.

Source:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean-Baptiste-Camille_Corot

 

Art Sunday #179: Max Liebermann – Restaurant Terrace in Nienstedten


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Max Liebermann (20 July 1847 – 8 February 1935) was a German-Jewish painter and printmaker, and one of the leading proponents of Impressionism in Germany.

The son of a Jewish fabric manufacturer turned banker from Berlin, Liebermann grew up in an imposing town house alongside the Brandenburg Gate.  He first studied law and philosophy at the University of Berlin, but later studied painting and drawing in Weimar in 1869, in Paris in 1872, and in the Netherlands in 1876–77. During the Franco-Prussian War (1870–71), Liebermann served as a medic with the Order of St. John near Metz. After living and working for some time in Munich, he finally returned to Berlin in 1884, where he remained for the rest of his life. He was married in 1884 to Martha Marckwald (1857–1943.

Source:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_Liebermann

 

Art Sunday #178 – Edgar Degas – The Star


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This painting is titled L’Étoile (The Star). We see a lone ballerina on the stage, the stage lighting shining brilliantly onto her and her performance. She is en pointe, balancing gracefully on one leg and maintaining a majestic pose. There are flowers on her white dress; her ribbon flows out from her extended neck; and she wears a crown atop her head. She bends her head back and closes her eyes in sweet triumph at the success of her performance (perhaps the audience is clapping for this young star at this moment), and her rosy cheeks blush with the satisfaction of accomplishment.

Source:  http://www.edgar-degas.net/the-star.jsp

 

Art Sunday #177: Paula Rego – The Tortoise Girl Racing Against the Snail


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Dame Paula Rego, DBE (born 26 January 1935), is a Portuguese visual artist who is particularly known for her paintings and prints based on storybooks. Rego’s style has evolved from abstract towards representational, and she has favoured pastels over oils for much of her career. Her work often reflects feminism, coloured by folk-themes from her native Portugal.

Rego studied at the Slade School of Fine Art, University College London and was an exhibiting member of the London Group, along with David Hockney and Frank Auerbach. She was the first artist-in-residence at the National Gallery in London. She lives and works in London.

Source:   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paula_Rego

 

Art Sunday #176: Berthe Morisot – Grain Field


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Berthe Marie Pauline Morisot (French: [mɔʁizo]; January 14, 1841 – March 2, 1895) was a painter and a member of the circle of painters in Paris who became known as the Impressionists. She was described by Gustave Geffroy in 1894 as one of “les trois grandes dames” of Impressionism alongside Marie Bracquemond and Mary Cassatt.

In 1864, she exhibited for the first time in the highly esteemed Salon de Paris. Sponsored by the government, and judged by Academicians, the Salon was the official, annual exhibition of the Académie des beaux-arts in Paris. Her work was selected for exhibition in six subsequent Salons until, in 1874, she joined the “rejected” Impressionists in the first of their own exhibitions, which included Paul Cézanne, Edgar Degas, Claude Monet, Camille Pissarro, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, and Alfred Sisley. It was held at the studio of the photographer Nadar.

She was married to Eugène Manet, the brother of her friend and colleague Édouard Manet.

Source:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berthe_Morisot

 

Art Sunday #175: Paul Signac – Comblat le Chateau


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Paul Victor Jules Signac, 11 November 1863 – 15 August 1935) was a French Neo-Impressionist painter who, working with Georges Seurat, helped develop the Pointillist style.

Paul Signac, Albert Dubois-Pillet, Odilon Redon and Georges Seurat were among the founders of the Société des Artistes Indépendants. The association began in Paris 29 July 1884 with the organization of massive exhibitions, with the device “No jury nor awards” (Sans jury ni récompense). “The purpose of Société des Artistes Indépendants—based on the principle of abolishing admission jury—is to allow the artists to present their works to public judgement with complete freedom”. For the following three decades their annual exhibitions set the trends in art of the early 20th century.

Source:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Signac

 

Art Sunday #174: Gaston La Touche – At The Riverbank


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Gaston La Touche, or de La Touche (24 October 1854 – 12 July 1913) was a French painter, illustrator, engraver and sculptor.  His family originally came from Normandy. He was born in Saint-Cloud. His passion for art began at a very early age and he finally persuaded his parents to give him drawing lessons, which he took for ten years from a local instructor at the rate of three Francs per month. His lessons had to be cancelled at the start of the Franco-Prussian War, when his family returned to Normandy to ensure their safety. This would be all the formal art training he ever received.

In his later years, he divided his time between his studio in Saint-Cloud and his family’s properties in Champsecret. In 1909, he was named an Officer in the Legion d’Honneur. In 1912, he completed his last major decorative project at “Villa Arnaga”, Edmond Rostand’s home in Cambo-les-Bains, which is now a museum. He died in Paris while painting.

Source:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gaston_La_Touche

Art Sunday #173: Salvador Dali – The Ghost of Vermeer of Delft which Can Be Used As A Table


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The Ghost of Vermeer of Delft Which Can Be Used As a Table is a small Surrealist oil painting by Salvador Dalí. Its full title is The Ghost of Vermeer of Delft Which Can Be Used as a Table (Phenomenologic Theory of Furniture-Nutrition). It makes reference to The Art of Painting by Johannes Vermeer, a famous seventeenth-century work in which a painter, thought to be a self-portrait of Vermeer, is depicted with his back to us, in distinctive costume. It is one of a number of paintings expressive of Dalí’s enormous admiration for Vermeer.

Vermeer is represented as a dark spindly figure in a kneeling position. The figure’s outstretched leg serves as a table top surface, on which sits a bottle and a small glass. This leg tapers to a baluster-like stub; there is a shoe nearby. The walls and the distant views of the mountains are based on real views near Dalí’s home in Port Lligat. In Vermeer’s painting the artist leans on a maulstick, and his hand is painted with an unusual blurriness, perhaps to indicate movement. In Dalí’s painting Vermeer rests the same arm on a crutch.

It is unsigned and undated but known to have been completed c.1934. It is currently on display at the Salvador Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg, Florida, on loan from the E. and A. Reynolds Morse collection.

Source:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Ghost_of_Vermeer_of_Delft_Which_Can_Be_Used_As_a_Table