Art Sunday: Michelangelo – Pieta


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A pietà (meaning “pity”, “compassion”) is a subject in Christian art depicting the Virgin Mary cradling the dead body of Jesus, most often found in sculpture. As such, it is a particular form of the Lamentation of Christ, a scene from the Passion of Christ found in cycles of the Life of Christ. When Christ and the Virgin are surrounded by other figures from the New Testament, the subject is strictly called a lamentation in English, although pietà is often used for this as well, and is the normal term in Italian.

A famous example by Michelangelo was carved from a block of marble and is located in St. Peter’s Basilica in the Vatican City. The body of Christ is different from most earlier pietà statues, which were usually smaller and in wood. The Virgin is also unusually youthful, and in repose, rather than the older, sorrowing Mary of most pietàs. She is shown as youthful for two reasons; God is the source of all beauty and she is one of the closest to God, also the exterior is thought as the revelation of the interior (the virgin is morally beautiful). The Pietà with the Virgin Mary is also unique among Michelangelo’s sculptures, because it was the only one he ever signed, upon hearing that visitors thought it had been sculpted by Cristoforo Solari, a competitor. His signature is carved as MICHAELA[N]GELUS BONAROTUS FLORENTIN[US] FACIEBA[T] “Michelangelo Buonarroti the Florentine did it”.

Source:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pietà

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Art Sunday: Tony Couch – October Russet


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Tony Couch received a BA degree in Art from the University of Tampa, did further work at Pratt Institute in New York while an artist for Associated Press, then for years freelanced and studied with Edgar A Whitney, ANA.

His book, “WATERCOLOR: You Can Do It!”, published by North Light in 1987 is now in its sixth printing, has become the publisher’s all time best selling art book and is the textbook in several college art departments teaching watercolor painting. It has also been published in Chinese for that market. A “technique” book, published in 1991 has been published in English and Japanese. A third book, on design, was published in 1992.

Click on the source link to see other fine works by this man.

Source:  https://www.tonycouch.com

Art Sunday: Paul Jackson – Love Song


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Paul Jackson, is an American watercolor painter who is well known for his large-scale works. His studio, The Avalanche Ranch is in Columbia, Missouri. Jackson was inducted as a signature member into the American Watercolor Society at the age of 30, and he is a signature member of the National Watercolor Society. His work has received top honors in national and international competition.

Jackson was born in Lawrence, Kansas and raised in Starkville, Mississippi. Most of Jackson’s work is privately owned, though many pieces are on display in galleries; his portraits of Governor and First Lady Roger and Pat Wilson hang in the Missouri State Capitol and Missouri Governor’s Mansion.

Source:  https://www.pauljackson.com and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Jackson_(artist)

Art Sunday #219: Edmund Dulac – Firebird


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Edmund Dulac (born Edmond Dulac; 22 October 1882 – 25 May 1953) was a French British naturalised magazine illustrator, book illustrator and stamp designer. Born in Toulouse he studied law but later turned to the study of art at the École des Beaux-Arts. He moved to London early in the 20th century and in 1905 received his first commission to illustrate the novels of the Brontë Sisters. During World War I, Dulac produced relief books and when after the war the deluxe children’s book market shrank he turned to magazine illustrations among other ventures. He designed banknotes during World War II and postage stamps, most notably those that heralded the beginning of Queen Elizabeth II’s reign.

Source:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmund_Dulac

Art Sunday #218: Jean de Brunhoff


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Jean de Brunhoff (9 December 1899 – 16 October 1937) was a French writer and illustrator remembered for creating the Babar books, the first of which appeared in 1931.

The Babar books began as a bedtime story that Cécile de Brunhoff invented for their children, Mathieu and Laurent, when they were four and five years old, respectively. She was trying to comfort Mathieu, who was sick. The boys liked the story of the little elephant who left the jungle for a city resembling Paris so much that they took it to their father, a painter, and asked him to illustrate it. He turned it into a picture book, with text, which was published by a family-run publishing house, Le Jardin des Modes. Originally, it was planned that the book’s title page would describe the story as told by Jean and Cécile de Brunhoff. However, she had her name removed. Due to the role she played in the genesis of the Babar story, many sources continue to refer to her as the creator of the Babar story.

Source:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_de_Brunhoff