Art Sunday: Vincent an Gogh – The Church at Auvers


600px-Vincent_van_Gogh_-_The_Church_in_Auvers-sur-Oise,_View_from_the_Chevet_-_Google_Art_Project

The Church at Auvers is an oil painting created by Dutch post-impressionist artist Vincent van Gogh in June 1890 which now hangs in the Musée d’Orsay in Paris, France.

The actual church is in Place de l’Eglise, Auvers-sur-Oise, France, 27 kilometres (17 mi) north-west of Paris.

The “simple deep blue” was also used in Portrait of Adeline Ravoux, painted in the same short period in Auvers-sur-Oise.

The foreground of The Church at Auvers is brightly lit by the sun, but the church itself sits in its own shadow, and “neither reflects nor emanates any light of its own.” After Van Gogh had been dismissed from the evangelical career he had hoped to continue in the Borinage, Belgium, he wrote to his brother Theo from Cuesmes in July 1880, and quoted Shakespeare’s image from Henry IV, Part 1 of the dark emptiness inside a church to symbolize “empty and unenlightened preaching”: “Their God is like the God of Shakespeare’s drunken Falstaff, ‘the inside of a church'”

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