Oops!


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I’ve been driving “Beater Truck” a lot since I buggered up Petey’s right front fender at the parking ramp.  I’ve been letting her sit in the garage and I obviously didn’t pay attention to just how long it’s been since I started her last.

End result:  Dead battery this morning.

Oops!  Well, thank god I have a battery charger.

Note to Self:  Hey dummy!  Set some reminders on your phone so this doesn’t happen again, ya idgit.  And while you’re at it, take her to the car wash and wash out that engine bay.  Sheesh!  There’s enough dirt in there to grow tomatoes.

Art Sunday #190: Hale Woodruff – Amistad Murals


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Repatriation

Hale Aspacio Woodruff (August 26, 1900 – September 6, 1980) was an African-American artist known for his murals, paintings, and prints. Woodruff’s best-known work is the three-panel Amistad Mutiny murals (1938) that he did for the Slavery Library at Talladega College. The murals are entitled: The Revolt, The Court Scene, and Back to Africa, portraying events related to the 19th-century slave revolt on the Amistad. They depict events on the ship, the U.S. Supreme Court trial, and the Mende people’s repatriation to Africa.

Source:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hale_Woodruff

and

https://www.npr.org/2015/12/19/459251265/with-powerful-murals-hale-woodruff-paved-the-way-for-african-american-artists