Smooth Jazz Sunday Evening #118: Paul Hardcastle – Drifting Away


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Sunday Morning


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It’s a wonderful Spring morning here in central Minnesota.  The sun is up, the sky is blue, the nearest clouds must be over Cheese Land and the temperatures are close to perfect.  Well, perfect as far as I’m concerned that is.

I was nominated for the “One Lovely Blog Award” by Prerna.  I normally don’t participate in these things even tho I really do appreciate the thought that someone felt I deserved this type of WP award.  So all appreciations go to Prerna at https://besondersite.wordpress.com/ .  Check out her WP and give her a follow if you aren’t already.  I will participate in a part of this wp award.

7 Random Facts About Me

1. I really do hate the cold even tho I live in what Miss C calls “The Frozen Tundra”.  It does get bitterly cold here during the winter and it can really drain my spirits.

2. Sunday is usually my day to clean floors and bake bread.  I have an added chore with having to prune back the crab apple tree in the front.  Its branches are starting to lay and the roof and they need to come off.

3. I really hate dusting.  It takes me back to a nightmare called “Basic Military Training” and I’d just as soon forget those days of having nothing to wear but “Fatigue Green“, very little hair and “GI Joe Birth Control glasses“.  Yes, I have pictures.  No I won’t post them.  Trust me.  They’re not sexy.

4. I opened a nice Cabernet last night to go with supper.  Spaghetti and wine.  They’re probably the reasons why I didn’t gain yesterday but I didn’t lose either.  Oh well.  You only go around once in life, right?  Not unless you believe in multiple lives like I do.

5. I really do enjoy listening to smooth jazz music (also referred to as “That other kind of music” by someone).

6. I love tasting new foods and seeing new places on this earth.  I’d love to tour India and Nepal some year soon.

7. I hate bees and wasps with a passion.  OK, I can handle the bees somewhat as long as I don’t bother them and they don’t bother me.  Wasps on the other hand …

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Art Sunday #124: Jean-Francois Millet – The Gleaners


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The Gleaners (Des glaneuses) is an oil painting by Jean-François Millet completed in 1857. It depicts three peasant women gleaning a field of stray grains of wheat after the harvest. The painting is famous for featuring in a sympathetic way what were then the lowest ranks of rural society; this was received poorly by the French upper classes.

The Gleaners is one of Millet’s best known works. Its imagery of bending peasant women gleaning was paraphrased frequently in works by younger artists such as Pissarro, Renoir, Seurat, and van Gogh. Art historian Robert Rosenblum says Millet’s painting introduced “imposing new presences in the repertory of mid-century art, with endless progeny in city and country. Daumier’s and Degas’s laundresses, and even more so Caillebotte’s floor-scrapers, are almost unthinkable without Millet’s epic hymn to labor.

The Gleaners provides evidence of Millet’s role as a contemporary social critic. His brutal depiction of three hunched, female paupers segregated from the laborers and the abundant crop in the distance demonstrates his attention to, if not necessarily sympathy for, the plight of the poorest members of the community around Barbizon and its larger neighbor, Chailly, as the area experienced the growing pains of French modernization. Only about thirty-five miles from the French capital (whose population doubled between 1831 and 1851), the rich, broad plain bordering the forest of Fontainebleau was among the earliest with a rail link to Paris, readily lending itself to feeding the burgeoning city. Studies tracing the transformation of rural France in the nineteenth century note that little change in peasant life occurred beyond northern France and the Paris basin until the last quarter of the century. Millet’s representation of class strife on a large-scale farm was thus uniquely modern in the 1850s.

Source:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Gleaners